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Thread: Paul McCartney Disguises the Beatles as ‘Lonely Hearts Club Band’

  1. #1 Paul McCartney Disguises the Beatles as ‘Lonely Hearts Club Band’ 
    Elder stvnsprngr's Avatar United-States
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    ...and fifty years later, I still get pulled in by stories about 'em...


    Paul McCartney Disguises the Beatles as ‘Lonely Hearts Club Band’: The Story Behind Every ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Song

    The Beatles - Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Take 9 And Speech)
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    By 1966, the four Beatles had more than their fill of Beatlemania. The rampant touring, the screaming girls, the “bigger than Jesus” controversy – to paraphrase a George Harrison song, it was all too much. So the band made a fundamental change in how they approached music. After August 1966, the lads would cease touring to focus only on being as creative as possible in the studio.

    But the Beatles didn’t just stop touring, they stopped releasing anything for the rest of the year. John Lennon went off to make a movie, How I Won the War, and the other three Beatles went on vacation. There was radio silence, as far as the band’s musical output was concerned, for nearly six months. That might not seem like much time now, but in the era of 1964-66 – when there was a new Beatles single, a concert, a movie, a TV appearance, an LP, every time fans turned around – this silence was deafening.

    When the Beatles finally reappeared in February 1967 with “Strawberry Fields Forever” and “Penny Lane,” every little thing had changed. Mop tops gone, facial hair present. Tinny-sounding concerts replaced by psychedelic videos. And music that had gotten more complicated, more ornate, more intricate, more strange – at least in comparison to what most pop stars were doing. The Beatles, as larger-than-life figures, now meant something totally different than they had seemed to a half-year ago.

    As the band was going through this transformation, which was much more organic than it must have seemed to your average 1966-67 teenybopper music fan, they were seeking anything to remove themselves from their previous image. For Paul McCartney, that meant the possibility of the Beatles literally becoming another group: the “Lonely Hearts Club Band.” Now the quartet wasn’t going to permanently switch monikers, but McCartney got a notion in the fall of 1966 that it might be easier for him and his bandmates to hurdle expectations if they wore the costume of another act.

    “I took an idea back to the guys in London: ‘As we’re trying to get away from ourselves – to get away from touring and into a more surreal thing – how about if we become an alter-ego band, something like, say, ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts’?” McCartney said in The Beatles Anthology. “‘I’ve got a little bit of a song cooking with that title’.” That idea had been “cooking” since McCartney had flown back from a holiday in Kenya with Beatles road manager Mal Evans. The two were joking about the salt and pepper packets during meal service on the plane and what the “S” and “P” might stand for. The name “Sgt. Pepper” came out of the conversation and stuck in McCartney’s brain.

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    Supreme Member wildhoney66's Avatar United-States
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    i wasn't around in the 60's so i have no idea personally on on how bad it got in the states, yes i've seen footage and heard stories but it's not the same as actually being there. my dad to use as an example isn't a beatles fan and it's not because he hates them he doesn't. it's because on how much they were played to this day he's still tired of them and i can relate to that cause i recall when B. Rhapsody was played non stop in (1992) for Wayne's world i'm still tired of it to a point i listen to it only like maybe 2 or 3 times a year. as for the beatles.

    i read somewhere that he wrote when i'm 64 when i think he was 17 or 19 i forget which age i read it was around that time anyways. my guess for those who were tired of hearing new music of them at the time were prolly grateful to get a break from them for awhile. even if you like the band and i do there are no doubt certain songs one gets tired of after awhile.
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    Senior Member johnthemanc's Avatar Black-private
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    not for me. i was 16 in 1967 and they were kings then, and to this day, they still are. I will still play a beatles album at least once a fortnight. as you can see, I am a little biased, but hey, who cares. lol.
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    Elder kidhugs's Avatar UK
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    many people who were NOT there, at the time, try to imagine the effect of the band on the culture of the day... but it's limited, in their minds, to the music and the screaming and such... but, to really grasp the concept, you have to know the state of affairs BEFORE the Beatles - musically, socially and artistically. You have to understand the grip that the music biz held on the charts, on the styles of bands and the way they dressed, looked and acted.. on everything...
    The Beatles, albeit somewhat unintentionally, changed every single aspect of life for the teens and pre-teens in the early to late sixties... a true renaissance and revolution at the same time.

    If you weren't THERE.. and hadn't been THERE for the preceding decade, there's simply no context for you to be able to accurately see what happened - in the streets, homes and minds of anyone under the age of 25.. in Europe and America..
    and it all happened within one year.
    It was an unimaginable social tsunami that, in all likelihood, could never happen again...

    and it is that very tsunami that many of us re-live whenever we play a Beatles record.

    and there just isn't any way to satisfactorily explain or convey it.. but it ain't just about the music.. or the albums...

    But the albums are, in living aural colour, the proof of the power of the movement... it is significant that, fifty years later, they are still unequalled in scope and ability and musical originality.
    In light of my recent battles with Rapidgator, I have decided to no longer keep my posts "current" If you want something, grab it while it's there.. and if the link is already down, send me a message and I'll service the post with a new link. Thanks - and sorry.
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    Supreme Member deadmanstar's Avatar United-States
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    Both my parents were 36 when Sgt. Pepper was released and yes it changed them. No more skinny ties or dull suits for dad. I'm sure he grew a beard around this time and let his hair grow a bit. My parents totally dug the 1960s and embraced the Beatles, Dylan and the Rolling Stones. I was just a kid but liked the music although I didn't get was going on but I did try to grow my hair a bit around this time. I was only 7 though when Pepper was released so I didn't quite understand it's impact.
    Thank you. As you all know, you just can't
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    if you will excuse me, I must be on my way.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by kidhugs Click here to enlarge
    many people who were NOT there, at the time, try to imagine the effect of the band on the culture of the day... but it's limited, in their minds, to the music and the screaming and such... but, to really grasp the concept, you have to know the state of affairs BEFORE the Beatles - musically, socially and artistically. You have to understand the grip that the music biz held on the charts, on the styles of bands and the way they dressed, looked and acted.. on everything...
    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by deadmanstar Click here to enlarge
    ...so I didn't quite understand it's impact.



    "There's something happening here.
    What it is ain't exactly clear..."


    I enjoy telling the whippersnappers "You grew up with it. You'll never get to hear it for the first time in history!"
    As I watch my memories change from memories to retro to nostalgia to history, the 'impact', it occurs to me, is what is lost to history.
    It's like the impact dries up, leaving only facts behind.
    Almost as if the impact had no substance at all.
    Maybe that's why it seems to be so difficult for 'lessons' of history to be learned.
    In high school, WW2 was still the big history lesson. But Pearl Harbor, for example, was just a fact to me. For my parents, it never stopped having 'heard it that morning on the radio' impact.
    The impact of the 1960's, on every societal level, still has visceral grasp on those who were 'there'.
    From Elvis to Hendrix, Picasso to Warhol, Playboy to birth control, Sputnik to the moon, Vietnam, assassinations, marches: all of it will pass on into dry fact.
    It is said that you exist until the last person who remembers you dies.
    Same for society? Last one to remember is the last one for whom it mattered?

    "And life flows on within you and without you..."

    One can only hope that the right echos/ripples of that impact will travel and have positive effect down the road.

    "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da..."

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    Sgt. Pepper’s Timing Was As Good As Its Music

    Fifty years ago, the Beatles released their masterpiece into a world ready to embrace a rock album as art.

    The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band turns 50 years old this week, and to mark the occasion, Apple Records has trotted out a deluxe reissue set, the crown jewel of which is a new stereo remix of the album by Giles Martin, son of the late Sir George Martin. The younger Martin’s mix is a revelation: For Beatles obsessives and audiophiles, it accomplishes the feat of finally delivering a stereo mix that feels both sonically and spiritually true to the original mono mix. For casual Beatles fans unfamiliar with the album’s mono mix, which has been largely unavailable during the compact disc and post–compact disc eras, the experience may well be akin to hearing the album anew, with fresh ears and a revived appreciation for what all the hype was about.

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    Supreme Member GSXR's Avatar Great-Britain
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    Listened to the story on the radio tonight while I was driving ...

    I have every album some twice, I sold the 'white album' about 10 years ago ..

    Of course all of it is digital now so I do not have to disturb the albums ....
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